McGuire on Media

Category Archives: Media ethics

The Schumpeterian moment in newspapers will require one litmus test—quality

I am back. This is my first blog post since Aug 31, 2011 when I posted a speech  I presented to the convention of the Society of Features Editors, Saturday, Aug. 27, in Tucson, Az. Later that night of the speech, close to midnight, my plane landed in Minneapolis. Within minutes I had fallen and […]

Lessons American Journalists can learn from the Murdoch scandals

On Monday night I did this season’s first Must See Monday presentation at The Walter Cronkite School. I spoke on the lessons we can learn from Britain’s Murdoch scandals. There were 200-250 people present, largely Cronkite freshmen and first year grad students. The prepared text is below. Again I admit to occasional ad libs that […]

National Center for Disability Journalism gives me a chance to do some things differently

After a personal 62-year journey, it was a paraplegic woman named Jennifer Longdon who finally made me take my disability responsibilities seriously. Jennifer’s story is a tough one to read and if you follow her twitter account @jenniferlongdon, it hasn’t gotten any easier in recent weeks. That twitter feed for the last three months is […]

Arizona Republic gets an A+ for reporting, B for its editorial and an F for publisher’s conflict

I have just read every mesmerizing word of The Arizona Republic’s coverage of the Fiesta Bowl scandal in the printed newspaper. About five pages of space were dedicated to covering a Fiesta Bowl internal report of the scandal which was triggered by a Republic investigation written by Craig Harris. Harris recently won the first Toner […]

Objectifying celebrities and other humans becoming huge journalism sin

I’ve known for some time that a lot of students thought it, but a student finally said it out loud in my Ethics class last Thursday. We were talking about celebrity foibles and the press’ interest in them. The Rex Ryan alleged foot fetish case, the alleged Brett Favre obscene picture situation and Lindsay Lohan’s […]

Arizona Republic did it right and reminded us again why newspapers matter

The Arizona Republic rose to the occasion Sunday morning with a comprehensive, well-written report that answered the important questions in the tragic shooting of Gabrielle Giffords which killed six. I am not talking prizes or using the P-word here. The Republic simply did an outstanding job of sorting fact from fiction and humanizing a horrible […]

Journalistic transparency and humility in a multiple platform world

Paola Boivin is a good, veteran columnist for the Arizona Republic. She’s prolific, engaged with the community and she strikes me as a columnist who plays it straight. Saturday night Boivin covered a close, heart-breaking loss by the Arizona State Sun Devils to Stanford. Her column Sunday morning was tough. She beat up a bit […]

Journalistic amnesia is a real negative when it comes to disability and the ADA

The criticism leveled most often at journalists is we have amnesia.  We get incredibly excited over things like tsunamis, hurricanes and oil spills and then we tend to forget them even while real suffering continues. The same thing happens with large societal issues. There is certainly an argument that we got smug about race relations […]

Disclosure needs to be THE First Amendment battleground for journalists

  The American Society of News Editors has had another busy week advocating for the First Amendment. It’s supported a decision in a Colorado Open Records case and it has urged member papers to write editorials advocating for a Federal Shield law. In these days of fading influence for everything mainstream media I am pleased […]

Sometimes a newspaper’s ethics guidelines have to be flexible

Okay, class, here’s your ethics hypothetical: Your veteran columnist and your investigative reporter have been aggressively covering abuses in the probate court system. They cover them so well the State Supreme Court Chief Justice sets up a 17-member commission to investigate probate practices.  The chief justice names as chair of that judicial committee your columnist’s […]